Sprout!

Buying fresh is best!

Food!

Marketplace@Sprout! makes the food we eat local, healthy, and fun. Come get tasty treats from local vendors when the café is open, or come take a workshop or class in our beautiful space so you can make those treats on your own! Every Friday, we’ve got a covered, rain-or-shine farmers market with a wide variety of treats from our local farms.

We’re part of a community that has farmers working hard to make a living for themselves and their kids, creative chefs and bakers working hard to figure out how to provide local and healthy food for their fans, and all of us work hard to find the right balance of food that helps us survive and thrive.

The Willamette Valley has a lot of “food insecurity,” but we’re here to help you connect with the people who make healthy, local food. We even have an easy SNAP match program.

Part of the fun at Sprout! comes when we work with local folks to create smart, fun businesses for Springfield and the whole metro area. We support innovative, creative food professionals in our Kitchen@Sprout! In our Hatch@Sprout! business incubator, we help local people figure out how to get started with a small business idea and become successful entrepreneurs.

And to top it all off, we host workshops and demonstrations so you can learn everything from making your own jam to understanding what the heck baking soda does when it comes in contact with something wet.

All in all, Sprout! is a pretty great place. We would love to have you join us!

Want to be a vendor at the Marketplace? Click here or contact the Marketplace Coordinator! We look forward to seeing you soon.

Want to join our Kitchen@Sprout!? Take a look here.

Want to know more about our small business incubator? Take a look at Hatch@Sprout here.


Success Story: Kitchen Curator- 100-Mile Bakery

100-mile-bakery“After trying to talk about a half dozen people into it, I realized this was my dream. I decided to go further and open up 100 Mile Bakery, sourcing all local ingredients from this area within 100 miles and turning them into baked goods”. Read More